Thunderworks Blog

The Best Dog Anxiety Treatment

  • Twin Sisters in the City:Thundershirt Review

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    This is an example page. It's different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introduces them to potential site visitors. It might say something like this:

    Hi there! I'm a bike messenger by day, aspiring actor by night, and this is my blog. I live in Los Angeles, have a great dog named Jack, and I like piña coladas. (And gettin' caught in the rain.)

    ...or something like this:

    The XYZ Doohickey Company was founded in 1971, and has been providing quality doohickeys to the public ever since. Located in Gotham City, XYZ employs over 2,000 people and does all kinds of awesome things for the Gotham community.

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  • Camping With Your Pet!

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    Summer gives so many of us a great excuse to get out in the fun, sun, sand and trees! We hear that many of our ThunderWorks customers LOVE to bring their furry friends along when going on a camping trip! SO, looking for some quick tips and info to make sure your camping trip is safe and fun with Fido? Our friends at offer some great ways to prepare for a fun weekend with the family… including the four-legged members!


    Before you leave:

    Check to see whether the camping area allows dogs, and familiarize yourself with the rules for pets at the site.

    Talk to your veterinarian and make sure your dog is healthy and up-to-date on all required vaccinations, particularly rabies. Ask your vet whether your dog should be vaccinated against Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease. Discuss appropriate flea and tick control. Be sure your dog is protected against heartworms, which are transmitted by mosquito bite and have been reported in all 50 states, according to the American Heartworm Society.

    Have an appropriate collar or harness with an identification tag. Use a cell phone number where you can be reached at all times, not a home phone number, on the tag. Microchipping your dog will provide an additional measure of protection in the event that your dog becomes lost. Register the microchip – or make sure the information is up to date if your dog already has a chip — so that you can be contacted when your dog is located.


    Packing for Your Dog

    Bring water for your dog to drink if a water supply is not available at the campsite. Do not allow your dog to drink out of standing bodies of water. Your dog should continue to eat his regular diet during the trip; pack enough food and treats to last for your entire stay. Pack a food dish and water bowl. Bring bedding and toys to keep your dog occupied as well. Take a copy of your dog’s health records and vaccination reports, especially important if you are crossing state lines. Other essential items include a leash and collar or harness, a carrier or other means to confine your dog when necessary, bags to pick up your dog’s waste, a first aid kit and any medications your dog takes regularly.


    What To Do with Your Dog While Camping

    Once at the camping ground, keep your dog on a leash or otherwise confined so that other campers are not disturbed and your dog is not at risk for becoming lost or injured. Be aware of keeping your dog away from things such as campfires and cooking utensils that can cause injury. A “leave it” command is also useful in case your dog begins to explore or picks up something dangerous in his mouth.


    Keep your dog close to you during your camping expedition. If you are unable to supervise your dog, be sure he is properly confined. Do not leave your dog confined in a closed car or tied to a stationary object though. Provide a carrier, crate, or portable fencing unit instead.

    While camping, check your dog’s fur and skin regularly for ticks as well as for plant material like thorns or burrs. Plant materials should be brushed free of your dog’s hair, if possible. In some situations, cutting or shaving the hair may be necessary to remove these items.


    Remove ticks promptly by grasping the tick near the skin and pulling gently and slowly away from the skin. Wear gloves when doing so. Do not handle ticks with bare hands as they can transmit diseases to you as well as to your dog.



    Do you bring your dog camping with you? What tips can you share?


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  • Summer Barbecue Safety For Your Pup!

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    The weather is warm, the sun is shining, sounds like a perfect time to cook up some delicious food and invite your friends over! However, a typical barbecue can be an unsafe place for dogs. Here are some things to keep in mind when celebrating the sunshine this summer.

    Keep Your Dogs Away From The Grill

    The actual Barbecue itself can be an unsafe place for your dog be around. Not only can it be extremely hot, but the proximity of propane tanks and sharp barbecue tools not the best place for your dog to be roaming. Create a barrier between your pup and the barbecue or try to give your dog something more fun to do like chasing a ball or playing with a toy.

    Watch For Hazardous Foods

    Possibly the biggest hazard to your dog at any BBQ is the food that is being served. Dogs naturally flock to food, but there’s a lot of food at a barbecue that can make your dog sick. Be sure to avoid foods with bones (steak, ribs, chicken, etc.) also keep away corn cobs, onions and chocolate. Bones can cause your dog to choke or perforate their bowl, onions (and many other foods) are toxic to dogs and corn cobs can cause a bowel obstruction. Chocolate is a classic dessert food and it can be fatal to your pooch. Even foods that are dog safe can cause harm when they’re hot off the grill and may burn your dog’s mouth.

    Keep An Eye On The Garbage

    Just because you’ve gotten this far by hiding the food, doesn’t mean they won’t work hard to find it in the trashcan. Make sure you have a waste bin with a lid and that the trash is in a somewhat hidden place from your dog.

  • This 4th Of July, Make Sure Your Pets Aren’t Stressed!

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    Did you know that the fourth of July is the biggest day for pet stress? In fact, shelters report the largest amount of runaway pets on this day due to stress caused by fireworks, large crowds and unfamiliar environments. Loud noises from fireworks can be frightening to anyone, but especially to our pets that have a heightened sense of hearing. They may panic, feel anxious, bark uncontrollably, chew through leashes, dig under fences & run away, claw destructively, suffer seizures, or run into traffic trying to escape the scary sounds. Don’t let this happen to your pet.

    In addition to having a ThunderShirt, to provide a gentle constant pressure to dramatically calm you pet, here are some more things to keep in mind:

    1. Pet ID. Make sure your pet has up-to-date identification in case he/she runs away when scared by noisy fireworks. ID can help your pet be returned to you safely.

    2. Avoid Fireworks. Don’t take your pet to events that involve fireworks. Your pet is better off being left home if you are going to partake in firework festivities.

    3. Crate Your Dog. If you regularly crate your dog, he/she may find the crate a place of comfort during fireworks. Make sure his favorite toy is available for further distraction.

    4. Don’t Leave Pets Outside. Keep pets inside as much as possible during fireworks displays. The insulation of your home will help drown out the noise and make your dog feel more secure.

    5. Don’t Scold a Scared Pet. This will scare and confuse a dog and reinforce fearful behaviors.

    For more information about ThunderShirt, visit their product page HERE. Have a safe and happy Fourth of July, everyone!

  • Tips To Keep Your Dog COOL And SAFE This Summer!

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    Summer is just a week away and for many areas throughout the United States, the temperatures, they are a rising!

    We looked to our friends at the Humane Society of the United States for some tips to follow to keep our pets cool this summer:

    #1: Never leave your pets in a parked car

    Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

    #2 Watch the humidity

    It's important to remember that it's not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet. Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly.

    #4 Take your dog’s temperature

    Taking a dog's temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Dogs' temperatures should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees. If your dog's temperature does, follow the instructions for treating heat stroke.

    #3 Limit exercise on hot days

    Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets, who typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

    #5 Don't rely on a fan

    Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don't cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

    #6 Provide ample shade and water

    Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don't obstruct airflow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

    #7 Cool your pet inside and out

    Freeze some pet-safe foods like peanut butter or wet dog food to make a cool appetizing treat. Always provide water, whether your pets are inside or out with you.

    #8 Watch for signs of heatstroke

    Extreme temperatures can cause heatstroke. Some signs of heatstroke are heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness. Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease. Some breeds of dogs—like boxers, pugs, shih tzus, and other dogs and cats with short muzzles—will have a much harder time breathing in extreme heat. If you think your pet is suffering from heat stoke, apply ice packs or cooled towels to their head, and offer small amounts of cold water- consult your veterinarian immediately.

    We hope these tips help you keep your furry friend cool, and most importantly SAFE this summer!

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