Thundershirt Reviews

  • Guest Blogger: Mikkel Becker

    Buy Now

    We’re thrilled to welcome back well-known and respected pet behavior and training expert, and Vetstreet.com contributor, Mikkel Becker on our blog today! She’s talking separation anxiety in our pets… Take it away, Mikkel!

    Countless canines become anxious when left alone. Stress upon separation spans from mild anxiety to an extreme state of panic. Whenever a dog is anxious at separation, it’s important to address the issue immediately, starting with a visit to your veterinarian. Stress upon separation rarely goes away without intervention, but more often, escalates over time. Caretakers of dogs who are anxious when left alone, find that normal tasks, like going to work or going out on a date, are difficult to impossible. The situation can become so severe the dog causes serious harm to themselves or to the home. Even for dogs who internalize stress, the state they are in emotionally is damaging long term to their health and affects their ability to cope with everyday stressors.

    There are numerous indicators of a dog nervous with separation. Signs can include excess salivation, panting, hyper vigilance, whining, barking, acute anorexia, pacing and inability to settle. Anxiety can amplify to the point of self-injury where the dog causes themselves serious harm as they attempt to claw, bite and jump out of exit points. The household also suffers devastation. Doors, crates and windows can be damaged as the dog attempts to flee, while household items like couches can be ravaged from anxious chewing. Dogs become so nervous they may even lose control of bodily functions and have accidents in the home.

    Dogs in this panicked state are literally helpless at their own behavior. Dogs don’t do these destructive behaviors out of spite as a way to teach their person a lesson for leaving them. Instead, their behavior stems from a root emotion of fear. To change the behavior, the root emotion must be changed.

    In my profession as an animal trainer working in conjunction with numerous veterinarians, including my father, Dr. Marty Becker, I help address separation anxiety on a regular basis. Separation anxiety is one of the most common behavior problems in dogs, with 20-40% of dogs reported as having the condition.

    Thankfully, with the right combination of training, environmental modification and veterinary intervention, separation anxiety can be decreased or eliminated. Whether a dog is only moderately nervous or in an all-out panic, it’s important to take the necessary steps to help a dog overcome their distress when left alone.

    Keep in mind, before training begins, it’s important to train under the supervision of a veterinarian who can rule out any medical conditions contributing to behavior and properly diagnose separation anxiety if needed.

    As an animal trainer, I want to share with you several of my top tips for addressing separation anxiety. The training is also helpful as a preventive tool against the development of separation anxiety.

     

    1. Use a ThunderShirt. One of my favorite tools in my training arsenal is the ThunderShirt. Regardless of the size or breed of the dog, the ThunderShirt works on about 80% of dogs. Even without any training, the ThunderShirt drastically reduces anxiety with near immediate results. The ThunderShirt works to non-invasively calm dogs in a similar manner to swaddling a baby.

    2. Many dogs dislike being crated, and some of their panic may stem from being shut in an enclosed area. If your dog dislikes the containment aspect of separation, find a more open area of the home to leave your pooch in that’s doggy proofed. The area of the home should have windows, as dogs feel less enclosed when windows are present. If you have a secure fence and your canine is not an escape artist or incessant barker when separated, consider allowing access the outdoors. By opening up the dog’s area, canines are less likely to feel trapped, and may relax as a result.

    3. When you leave and when you come back, keep attention on the dog as minimal as possible. A simple, non-emotional goodbye or greeting will do, rather than hugs, kisses and emotional words. The more calm and nonchalant the greetings, the less worked up the dog will get. When you return, wait five minutes or until the dog calmly settles into a relaxed sit or down, before acknowledging.

    4. Reduce departure cues. Throughout the day, even on weekends, randomly put on your shoes, pick up the keys, turn on the car, open the garage and do other cues that may signal you’re leaving. Often dogs become anxious even upon the perception of these cues, because they signal you’re leaving. However, if you do these cues with the end result being you still stay home, the cue loses its meaning.

    5. Train your dog to enjoy time alone in their own area. Put the dog in a certain area of the home, like an xpen, or tether the dog with a leash and harness next to a comfortable area, like a dog bed. Place food puzzles or long lasting chews in these areas for the dog to nibble on. To begin with, sit a few feet away and get the dog comfortable with just a short distance separation. The training can be made more challenging later by giving the food item and leaving to go into another room or going outside. Return to the dog before they finish eating their food reward. The idea is to have separation happen with associated pleasurable rewards and at a pace the dog can remain relaxed at. Play classical music during separation, proven to calm pets, to further promote relaxation.

    6. Protect your pet. During training, management techniques like sending the dog to doggy daycare or a dog sitter during inevitable long departures is helpful. In some cases, medication from your veterinarian added in combination with training, will provide especially anxious pets with the best chance of recovery.

  • Singing for ThunderShirt by Special Guest, Sandy Robins

    Buy Now

    I have always been “blessed” with cats that sing in the car. But Ziggy out sings every cat I’ve ever known.

    When we took him home from the animal shelter, I put his vocals down to nerves.

    Not long after, we had to take him to the vet for his kitty shots. The moment we placed him in his carrier, the singing began.

    It started off with a tentative operatic dolcissimo (very sweet) “mew”. Followed by a second and then a third.  As we turned the corner he started scratching on the side of the carrier and the mew got more espressivo (insistent). Then he tried a new tactic and the mews got doloroso (sad and mournful).  From his perspective, he probably thought I wasn’t listening so he began to get more insistenta (insistent) until his vocals turned fortissimo (very loud).

    On the way home, it was a repeat performance. He wasn’t being naughty; he was really just stressed and anxious. Who knows what experiences he had an in a car before we adopted him.

    A few weeks later we were off to the vet again for follow-up shots. And soon Ziggy was singing the same aria. The next week, when it was time for his rabies shot courtesy of the animal shelter, we were back in the car and Ziggy was singing again.

    What was so interesting was the fact that it sounded like the same song.

    Cats in fact have quite a large vocabulary. Author and naturalist Jean Craighead George who writes about the language cats have in her award-winning book The Cats of Roxville Station and has studied cats in nature, says that the different ways in which a cat meows has a special idiosyncratic meaning. She has categorized some feline vocalizations as follows. They are written phonetically to emphasize the different sound and tones:

    In Kittens:

    • Mew (high pitched and thin) - a polite plea for help
    • MEW! (loud and frantic) - an urgent plea for help

    Adult cats:

    • Mew - plea for attention
    • Meow - emphatic plea for attention
    • MEOW! - a command!
    • Mee-o-ow (with falling cadence) - protest or whine
    • MEE-o-ow (shrill whine) - stronger protest
    • MYUP! (short, sharp, single note) - righteous indignation
    • MEOW! Meow! (repeated) - panicky call for help
    • Mier-r-r-ow (chirrup with lilting cadence) - friendly greeting

    Soon I worked out that Ziggy had composed a feline “song”:

    Here are his lyrics:

    Mew…mew…

    MEW!!

    Meow

    MEOW!

    Mee-o-ow

    MYUP! MYUP!

    MEE-o-ow

    MEE-o-ow

    Second verse same as the first.

    So I decided to translate. It goes something like this:

    Hello… Helloow …

    What’s happening here?

    This isn’t fair

    You scooped me out of my favorite chair

    I was a sleep

    What did you think --I wouldn’t make a peep?

    What’s happening now?

    Meeow miaow

    The vet!! Oh No!

    I don’t want to go

    I’m prodded and given a shot

    It calls for a total boycott

    Take me home….

    NOW!!!

    Meow….

    Finally I couldn’t take it anymore. There are always going to be vet visits for one reason or another. So I decided he was the perfect candidate for a feline ThunderShirt.

    I decided the best way to test the shirt was the take him one way to the vet without it and put it on for the journey home.

    I chose a fairly innocuous vet visit, namely, he was simply going for a Mani-Pedi. No needles or prodding involved. I even took Fudge along in the hope that seeing how she behaved would perhaps help him remain calm.

    No such luck. The outward-bound trip was typical – very vocal with Fudge simply staring at him in disbelief that a cat could make so much noise. So just before we popped him back in his carrier, I put him in a ThunderShirt. I reckoned he wasn’t going to have to walk around wearing it so he didn’t need to get used to it from that standpoint.

    On with the shirt, into the carrier and off we went home. It’s a 15-minute drive. And I must say Fudge and I enjoyed it immensely -- in total silence! I don’t say he enjoyed the ride, but he didn’t seem stressed and anxious to get out of the carrier, as was his typical modus operandi.

    I was amazed how it worked instantly. But apart from keeping him calm, it helped me to drive home fully concentrating on the road and not worrying about my feline passenger.

    When we got home, I took off the shirt and placed in his carrier, ready to go for next time.

     

    Sandy Robins  is an award-winning author and pet lifestyle expert.

    Follow her on Facebook here: http://www.Facebook.com/SandyRobinsPetLifestyleExpert

  • “Get it While its… Green!” Check out our new, Limited Edition Green Polo!

    Buy Now

    At ThunderShirt, we value variety, and think your dog should too! So, why not change up their relaxation routine with the Limited Edition Green Polo?!  Perfect for both male and female dogs, the contrasting combo of bright Lime Green and sophisticated Hunter Green are a stylish segue from summer to Fall!

    To order the Limited Edition Green Polo for a lovable dog in your life, visit www.ThunderShirt.Com!

    3

  • Insta-hey! We’re on Instagram, follow us why don’t ya!

    Buy Now

    That’s right, you can follow all the fun happenings at ThunderWorks by following us on Instagram! Stay tuned for fun contests, fan shout outs and more news from us at ThunderWorks!

    instagram

    http://instagram.com/thunderworks

  • Thundershirt In action!

    Buy Now

    Today we wanted to share some awesome user-submitted videos of how the Thundershirt works great on their dogs! If you have a video of your pet doing loving their Thundershirt, please feel free to share!

     

    We love that Conan loves is monogrammed Thundershirt!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mkp9rGZ6_bA

     

    So happy that Royal and Sandy are less anxious in storms!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXQc79l1fiA

     

    And we love this one!  This Thundershirt owner wanted to show how her dog Spirit, has relaxed so much by using the Thundershirt, that he no longer needs to wear it! Scout, the cat is happy about this one!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQeDITm_hsg

  • Thundershirt rescues Tiny Santa from Big Pit Bull

    Buy Now

    Check out this funny holiday video we found, Thundershirt to the rescue for this little Santa!!

    Watch full video here:  Thundershirt rescues Tiny Santa from Big Pit Bull

  • Thundershirt Earns ‘Petfinder Seal of Approval’

    Buy Now

    Thundershirt Earns ‘Petfinder Seal of Approval’

    Brand Among First to Receive Pet-Friendly Designation –

    Durham, N.C.– Thundershirt Founder Phil Blizzard is thrilled to announce today that the company has been recognized with the first-ever, official “Petfinder Seal of Approval.”

    The Petfinder Seal of Approval extends the trust and authority of the Petfinder name to products, services, brands and initiatives that have met specific pet-friendly criteria. Petfinder, the online leader in responsible pet ownership, is committed to championing individuals, organizations and brands that are actively working to improve the lives of pets through a variety of programs, including the new “Petfinder Seal of Approval.”

    Petfinder Seal of Approval applicants are individually qualified, and criteria for qualifications are detailed on their website, but include the absence of harmful testing on animals, the promotion of adoption over sale of pets, and the safety history of the product, among others.

    Great for fear of thunder, barking problems, separation anxiety, car or travel anxiety, crate anxiety, noise anxiety, leash pulling, general fearfulness, reactivity, excitability and more, the Thundershirt is the best solution for pet anxiety.

    With its patent-pending design, the Thundershirt applies gentle, constant pressure to the torso. This pressure has a dramatic calming effect for dogs and cats if they are anxious or fearful. Anxiety experts believe that pressure has a calming effect on the nervous system and may release calming hormones like endorphins or oxytocins.

    The Thundershirt for Dogs is available in sizes XXS to XXL, and comes in their signature Heather Grey, Pink or Blue Polo designs. The Thundershirt for Cats is available in sizes S, M and L, and Heather Grey only. Suggested retail starts at $39.95, and the products can be personalized with custom embroidery for an additional charge.

    Visit www.Thundershirt.com for more information, or contact Kerry Sutherland at K. Sutherland PR, Kerry@ksutherlandpr.com or 949-328-4895 to request a product sample, high-resolution image or interview.

    - ### -

    About Thundershirt

    Founded in 2009 in Durham, N.C., Thundershirt’s mission is to bring relief to the millions of dogs, cats and their families struggling to cope with anxieties. The Thundershirt is designed to apply a constant, gentle pressure to a dog or cat’s torso creating a dramatic calming effect for most users. Thundershirt continues to investigate dog and cat anxiety and fear issues with scientific-based studies and surveys from recognized veterinarians and pet owners.  Thundershirt has already helped hundreds of thousands of dogs across the country and around the world.

    The company also donates thousands of Thundershirts and funding to rescue groups and shelters to help these organizations manage their anxiety cases and find permanent homes. Thundershirts are sold online at www.thundershirt.com and by retail stores, veterinarians, trainers and kennels across the country.

    Online: thundershirt.com

    Facebook: facebook.com/Thundershirt

    Twitter: @Thundershirt

    Pinterest: pinterest.com/Thundershirt

     

    About Petfinder

    Petfinder is the largest online, searchable database of animals that need permanent homes. With more than 320,000 adoptable pets from more than 13,700 animal shelters and rescue groups throughout the U.S., Canada and Mexico, Petfinder has facilitated more than 20 million adoptions since it was launched in 1996. In addition to being an adoption database, Petfinder also is an all-inclusive resource guide for how to select the right family pet and build a successful, life-long relationship. Thanks to its sponsors, Petfinder is free to both visitors and to its animal placement organization members. Sponsors include BISSELL Homecare, Inc., a manufacturer of home cleaning and floor care products, The Animal Rescue Site, PetFirst Healthcare, the exclusive pet insurance provider for Petfinder, and HomeAgain, a microchip and pet recovery service.

    Online: petfinder.com

    Facebook: facebook.com/petfinder

    Twitter: @Petfinder

    Pinterest: pinterest.com/petfinder

    iPhone App: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/petfinder.com-adopt-pets/id354876999?mt=8

  • Copperas Cove Animal Shelter is using Thundershirt to help get dogs adopted!

    Buy Now

    Check out the wonderful story:

     

    http://www.kcentv.com/story/19466821/animal-shelter-hopes-thundershirts-will-help-adoptions

  • National Take Your Cat to the Vet Week

    Buy Now

    Many cat owners don't take their cats to the vet regularly because it can be such a difficult task, but it is important to keep you cats healthy and go for regular check ups.  Check out this cat's amazing transformation after using a Thundershirt to go to the vet and for the first time ever NOT having a difficult vet visit!  You can read the entire story here: http://conservationcubclub.com/2012/08/take-your-cat-to-the-vet-week-the-tiniest-tiger-visits-doctor/

    I hope this story encourages those of you that struggle getting your cats to the vet for their check-ups.  My parents had hopes that the Thundershirt for Cats would help me and it truly did.

    My doctors said that some parents had come in with dogs wearing Thundershirts and they too expressed success in keeping their canines calm.  I was the first feline to come in wearing the new Thundershirt for cats at my clinic.  The doctors are going to recommend  it to other cat parents to help relieve stress.

    I am proud that I could be a role model for my fellow felines so that more parents will be able to take their cats to the vet for regular check ups without so much anxiety and accidents.

  • Thundershirt's Scardey Pet Challange

    Buy Now

    Thundershirt has helped hundreds of thousands of

    dogs and cats across the nation suffering from

    anxiety and stress, most often caused by storms.

    But the concept is so simple it may have you

    asking yourself-

    does it really work?

    Using a gentle, constant pressure to calm your

    dog or cat, similar to the way parents swaddle

    their infants, Thundershirt effectively relieves any

    anxiety, fearfulness, stress, barking and more.

    But, don’t just take our word for it- put it to the test

    yourself with our new

    Scaredy Pet Challenge!

    Find out more at: http://thundershirt.com/Media/Scaredy_Pet_Challenge.pdf

1-10 of 23

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3