So… you know where to go… but how are you going to get your dog there? Tips for car travel with your dog.

While bringing your pet along on your family vacation can be a wonderful way to include your pet in on the family fun. It’s important to know that pets do not travel the same way we do. Many times, long rides in the car, unfamiliar locations and new surroundings can contribute to pet anxiety. ThunderWorks wants to remind you that while it may be fun for the pet owner to have their buddy by their side as they embark on new adventures, there are a few things to keep in mind when traveling with your pet.

 

Make them comfortable.

o   Be sure your pet has enough room in the car so they aren’t squished. For added comfort and calming, make sure you have a ThunderShirt with you for the car ride and spray their shirt or a blanket from home with ThunderSpray for additional calming.

Make more frequent pit stops.

o   Dogs might not be able to hell you when they have to “go” be aware that they often need to eliminate more frequently and account for the time you’ll need to stop, walk and use the bathroom. We recommend using the ThunderLeash in case added restraint is needed in a new surrounding. (You also won’t have to pack a harness!)

If your dog is extremely anxious in the car.

o   Consider using a ThunderCap. This helps reduce some of the visual stimulation that a pet experiences, which helps them in stressful situations. Also, consider a distraction toy, to help your dog focus on something else, rather than the car!

Most important… BE SAFE!

o   It’s a lot safer for everyone if your dog is securely fastened or confined during car trips. A large dog in your lap or a small one bouncing around the accelerator pedal can be distracting and dangerous—and should you have an accident, your unrestrained dog might be thrown about the cab. Popular options for safe dog travel include dog seat belts, crates and car barriers. If you use a seat belt, be sure to put your dog in the backseat. When riding in the front, dogs can be injured or even killed if you have an accident and an airbag deploys.

o   Don’t forget to microchip your dog before leaving home, and attach an ID tag with your cell phone number to his collar. If you’re traveling to multiple places during your trip and you don’t have a cell phone, you can buy inexpensive temporary ID tags to use along the way.

o   Never leave your dog in a hot or cold car unattended. Doing so isn’t just uncomfortable for your dog—it can be life threatening.

o   Identify emergency animal clinics close to locations you plan to visit during your trip. This is an especially important precaution if your dog is enjoying his golden years.

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