Thunderworks Blog

  • “Get it While its… Green!” Check out our new, Limited Edition Green Polo!

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    At ThunderShirt, we value variety, and think your dog should too! So, why not change up their relaxation routine with the Limited Edition Green Polo?!  Perfect for both male and female dogs, the contrasting combo of bright Lime Green and sophisticated Hunter Green are a stylish segue from summer to Fall!

    To order the Limited Edition Green Polo for a lovable dog in your life, visit www.ThunderShirt.Com!

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  • Winner Winner! ThunderLeash wins coveted Pet Product News Editor’s Choice Award!

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    We’re thrilled to announce that the new ThunderLeash is a proud recipient of one of the highest pet industry honors, the Pet Product News Editor’s 1 Choice Award!  Not only are we honored to have been chosen, but we are extremely grateful that the editors of Pet Product News International found the ThunderLeash to be an innovative and useful solution!

    New to the ThunderLeash? Allow us to introduce you!

    ThunderLeash will help make walking your dog a hassle free, positive experience for both you and your dog. Dog harnesses can be great tools for many dogs, but not everyone wants to make the effort to get one onto their dog or to have extra stuff to carry around. ThunderLeash is the perfect combination of simplicity and functionality. For those times you just need a standard leash for a quick walk or for times when your dog is well behaved, simply connect the ThunderLeash to your dog’s collar just like any other leash. But for times when pulling might be a problem, simply wrap ThunderLeash around your dog’s torso and slide it into the harness slot. Now whenever your dog pulls a mild pressure is applied to his torso and the pulling will quickly cease. With the ThunderLeash you will finally be able to walk your dog, instead of being walked by your dog.

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  • Pets Can Suffer From Empty Nest Syndrome Too

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    We are happy to announce that we have another guest blogger today! Take it away Sandy!

     

     Pets really enjoy the summer months as much as people do simply because the kids are home from school and there’s lots of activities and outings to keep them engaged and happy to be around the people they love the most.

    Then September rolls around and children go back to school or off to college and the sudden emptiness in the home can leave them feeling very lonely and depressed – and often anxious too.

    According to Professor Nicholas Dodman, director of the small animal behavior clinic at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Grafton, MA at least one in six dogs will exhibit symptoms of separation anxiety or display increased levels if they are already prone to the condition, along with a countless number of cats.

    “Dogs and cats that enjoy human interaction and affection can become psychologically unglued especially if their best human friend in the household happens to be one of the kids and suddenly that person “disappears” and goes off to college. It definitely leaves a void in the pet’s lifestyle,” explains Dodman. “The same applies when kids go back to school and suddenly their lives are so filled with extra mural activities that they no longer have the same amount of time for fun that includes the family pet.”

    Dodman cited the a canine client who had slept in with his teenage best friend since puppyhood and when the boy went off to college, the dog found himself sleeping alone in the empty bedroom.  He started howling at night looking for a new place to sleep.

    This dog would have been an ideal candidate for a ThunderShirt, put on at bedtime to help ease his anxiety and get him into a different sleeping routine.

    Cats can get equally upset but because they don't often display their feelings, people are often unaware that they are feeling anxious and stressed in similar situations too.

    Reduced appetite or complete loss of appetite is a sign that your pet may be suffering from empty nest syndrome.

    When it comes to dogs, signs of stress and anxiety can include sudden pacing and even at attempt to escape by scratching the back of a door or pulling down a blind, trying to get into a trashcan or chewing on a couch.

    For a feline perspective a cat   that is usually friendly and comes to greet their favorite people may stop doing this and lie and sleep a lot more. Some can also begin grooming excessively, pulling out chunks of fur until their skin is raw.

    Of course there are ThunderShirts for cats too and it's a good idea to put one your cat (or dog) if they are going to be left home along for long periods until they are better adjusted to the new dynamics of the household.

    Exercise is a great stress-reliever too. Be sure to schedule walks with your dog several times a day – even they are short ones and amp up games with your cat. Wand toys keep them very engaged.  There are also battery-operated toys that can be pre-set so that they can play by themselves throughout the day too.

     

    Sandy Robins is an award-winning author and respected Pet Lifestyle Expert.

    Sandy and Cat

  • Introducing The ThunderToy and ThunderTreats!

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    We’re so happy to add some more members to the ThunderWorks family!

    toy treats

    Introducing the ThunderToy and ThunderTreats!

    Both work together to not only keep our dogs occupied, but calm them down too!

    They are a perfect accompaniment to the ThunderShirt, especially during stressful or anxiety-prone times.

    How it works:

    The ThunderToy slowly releases the delicious ThunderTreats over time which calm your pet due to the relaxing ingredients.

    The ThunderTreats are corn, soy and wheat free and contain chamomile and lavender for added relaxation benefits!

     

     

    Does your pooch deserve a ThunderToy and ThunderTreat? You can purchase one here!

     

  • Guest Blogger: Mikkel Becker!

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    We’re thrilled to have well-known and respected pet behavior and training expert, and Vetstreet.com contributor, Mikkel Becker back on our blog today! She’s talking summer storm season and pet anxiety. Take it away, Mikkel!

    Thunderstorm phobia is a common fear I address in dog training. Countless canines suffer every year when summer storm season hits. Symptoms of fear include panting, pacing, increased salivation, whining, shaking, hyper vigilance, looking overly sleepy, lip licking, furrowed brows, the whites of their eyes showing and shadowing their owner or attempting to hide or flee. Although the external signs of fear vary amongst individual dogs, the internal state of distress the dog experiences cannot be ignored.

    While logically there’s little danger involved for a dog kept indoors during a lightning storm, there’s no reasoning a canine out of their fear. The fear is very real to that dog, and without intervention, the fear not only remains for most dogs, but grows stronger with time. Fear is a motivator in the natural survival response for the animal to move themselves away from a perceived threat and into a safe place. Dogs are wired to avoid dangerous situations and flee danger for self-preservation. Loud booms and flashes of light are two such stimulus’ that dogs are wired to flee from, rather than run to, for survival. There is also the likelihood of a genetic influence, as studies have shown that certain tendencies, such as fear of numerous noises and separation anxiety, are linked to the fear of thunderstorms.

    Ongoing fear decreases a dog’s quality of life and impacts even internal functions, like debilitating their body’s immune system. Dogs are also at risk for injury or worse when they panic, as they may hurt themselves when attempting to escape or when running in a blind panic. It’s not only traumatic for a dog to experience ongoing fear, but it’s stressful to the pet parent who feels helpless to calm their pet.

    Though our dogs can’t help the fearful state they’re naturally in with thunderstorms, as loving pet parents, we have the ability to help our pets. Dogs don’t need to suffer needlessly. With just a few changes, a dog’s fear of thunderstorms can be drastically decreased or taken away all together.

    Here are the top recommendations I offer to pet parents when training their dog to relax during storms.

    The first tool I recommend to owners is the ThunderShirt. The ThunderShirt is essential, as it instantly calms the dog in a non-invasive manner. The gentle pressure of the ThunderShirt increases feel good endorphins and is similar to the comfort a baby experiences when swaddled. Pressure has a calming effect on animals, as made famous by Temple Grahndin in her work of transferring the calming effects of pressure on cattle to other uses, such as decreasing anxiety for people with autism. The effects of pressure have likewise been shown to calm dogs.

    The ThunderShirt is essential, because the wrap has immediate results for calming the dog with no prior training needed. The ThunderShirt works in about 80% of canines, thus it’s the most effective and natural tool to decrease anxiety in dogs. If the dog is in an overly panicked state, other methods may be used to no avail when a storm hits, because the dog is already so over threshold, they are not receptive to reinforcement. When dogs are panicked, even activities they would normally do without hesitation, such as eating a treat or playing with a ball are denied, because the dog is too fearful to respond. Fear also inhibits learning; with animals most receptive to learning when they are in a relaxed state. The ThunderShirt is my go-to tool as it calms a dog and brings them to an emotional state where they are receptive to learning and can receive rewards to help build a positive association with the storm.

    Once the dog’s emotional state has been brought to a better baseline, there are additional tactics I use. One of my favorite solutions is to create a thunder room in the house. A thunder room should have the feeling of a hide-away where the dog can escape to and should be somewhat insulated from outside noise. A roomy closet or bathroom is ideal. Static electricity may build up in a dog’s coat during a storm, thus keeping the dog on hard floors rather than carpet and using dryer sheets to rub over the dog’s fur is helpful. Music can be calming for dogs and drowns out noise. For best results, play music loud enough to drown out some of the booms from the thunder, with classical music shown to have the greatest relaxation effect. The blinds should also be kept closed in the house, as flashes of light can be frightening for canines if they happen to catch a glimpse.

    Your dog should also be given training to associate the storm with good things happening to change their emotional baseline. For a play focused dog that enjoys fetch or structured tug, start a game as soon as the storm hits and continue throughout. Keep in mind you may want to play these games inside while sheltered from the elements and the loud noise. For other dogs, the storm should be associated with delectable treats. Each time the thunder hits, immediately deliver a piece of high value reward, such as boiled chicken or turkey hotdog. You can also use the storm to refocus your dog on another activity they deeply enjoy, such as trick training or giving them a stuffed food puzzle. Another less thought of but effective tool is to get a dog into a different state by triggering a behavior that’s innate in a dog. Use a chase toy, such as a fishing pole with a toy on the end to get your dog involved in a game of chase, or even race off a few steps yourself and reward your dog with a treat for following. You can also howl or bark, potentially triggering other dogs in your household if present, and starting a group howl. The chase or howl may break the cycle of fear even for a moment as a different area of the brain is engaged, where at that point the dog can be refocused onto another activity, such as eating their tasty treats.

    In addition, consider daily exercise for your dog as it boosts serotonin levels, a regulator of mood, and releases other feel good endorphins that build a dog’s resiliency. Exercise also provides a productive outlet for pent up energy that will help a dog relax more during the rest of their day. During the summer, dogs should be exercised regularly during the cool parts of the day with the amount of exercise needed depending upon the dog’s age, breed and energy level. Dogs should be exercised preemptively before a storm hits.

     

  • Dog Washing for a GREAT Cause!

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    We hosted a charity dog wash on Friday, May 31st at our headquarters in Durham, NC. The event was to raise funds for a local non-profit, the Coalition to Unchain Dogs, which is dedicated to improving the welfare of dogs living outdoors on chains. A total of 53 dogs were washed, totally an $800 donation! We just wanted to share this adorable photo with you, for the rest of the pictures from this event check out our Facebook album here!

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  • Insta-hey! We’re on Instagram, follow us why don’t ya!

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    That’s right, you can follow all the fun happenings at ThunderWorks by following us on Instagram! Stay tuned for fun contests, fan shout outs and more news from us at ThunderWorks!

    instagram

    http://instagram.com/thunderworks

  • Tips to Keep Your Pets Calm on 4th of July

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    Check out this video of our tips for the 4th of July:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJr3Ls5RdQI&feature=c4-overview&list=UUuIymvC4yigIVyLy_srg25g

  • Wishing you a “Thunderful” 4th of July! Now, let’s have a treat!

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    What a better of a way to include out pets in on the patriotic fun than to whip up these delicious red white and blue treats!

    We found this recipe from one of our favorite bloggers, Sugar the Golden Retriever and thought they make the perfect cool and summery treat for our favorite four-legged pals!

    Frosty Yogurt Berries Bone Parfait

    treats

    Ingredients

    ~1 tablespoon of Greek Yogurt

    ~1 tablespoon of Plain Yogurt

    ~2 teaspoon of fresh blackberries juice (=3 pieces of blackberries)

    4 x-small pieces of strawberries

    1 teaspoon of homemade toasted coconut honey oats (using old fashion oats, coconut oil and honey)

    Directions

    Use a Bone cookie cutter as a mold. Place it on a flat surface. We used a clear plate.

    1. Pour into the mold ~ 1 tablespoon of Greek yogurt.* Freeze it for about an hour.

    *This is the first time we used Greek yogurt for frosty paw recipe. It does not freeze well unlike the regular plain yogurt.*

    2. Pour ~2 teaspoons of the fresh blackberries juice. Smashed blackberries can be added too. Freeze it for about 20 to 30 minutes.

    3. Place little pieces of strawberries.

    4. Pour ~1 tablespoon of plain yogurt. Freeze it for 20 minutes.

    5. Place the tasted oats on top. Freeze it for another 10-15 minutes.

     

    Image via

  • ThunderShirt works really well on this cool cat!

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    We love when ThunderShirt fans post fun videos of our products in action! This video that posted to YouTube.com last year has recently gone viral! In it, one “Scaredy cat” tries on his new ThunderShirt for the very first time, and immediately freezes, then flops. The cat’s owners try repeatedly to stand him back up, nearly a dozen times during the hilarious video, but the reaction is always the same- freeze, followed by flop.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOcfS7xwVfY

    While this video is pretty entertaining, there is no need to worry. The ThunderShirt is not causing discomfort; cats are not used to being dressed and need time to adjust to feeling “swaddled” by the shirt.

    If you are just introducing your cat to the ThunderShirt, keep in mind that cats are amazingly sensitive to touch and sometimes require a little more adjustment time in the beginning. If a cat initially appears uncomfortable or does the “Freeze & Flop”, we recommend putting the ThunderShirt on your cat with a very light pressure for about 5-10 minutes so they can get used to it. Engaging your cat in play with their favorite toy or laser pointer is also a great way to get them moving and used to the ThunderShirt.

    Do you use ThunderShirt on your cat? We’d love to hear from you! Feel free to comment below or reach out to us via social media!

     

    Facebook: facebook.com/ThunderShirt

    Twitter: @ThunderShirt

    http://www.twitter.com/thundershirt

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