Thunderworks Blog

  • Welcome, 2014!

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    2014welcome

    What a year it’s been and what an amazing year we have to look forward to! Cheers to everyone celebrating the New Year! We hope you have a safe and happy holiday!

    From your friends at ThunderWorks.

  • It’s the Most Wonderful Time of The Year!

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    holiday

    Wishing our amazing followers, fans and customers an incredible holiday! We hope you and your pets are surrounded by family and friends!

    From all of us at ThunderWorks!

  • Guest Blogger: Sandy Robins on Keeping Pets Safe This Holiday Season!

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    The holiday season is a busy time in every household. Friends and relatives come and go, the kids are home from school and college and often there are parties to plan too. Whether you embrace the festivities, or run screaming from an army of relatives who invade your peaceful home, remember that the holidays pose special risks to your pets.

    By paying attention to a few basic safety precautions, you can keep your canine and feline companions out of harm’s way and have a safe and happy holiday season.

    Decorating for the Howlidays

    When it comes to putting up Christmas tree lights and other lighting decorations, always look for the shortest route to the plug point and avoid leaving excess wiring lying on the floor.  Chewing cords can be life threatening to both dogs and cats. There are special cord covers infused with bitter aloe that will further prevent them from chewing.

    Also it's a great idea to sprinkle pepper on the lower branches of the tree. This will end any ideas your cat may have of trying to climb it! Further, if you have an inquisitive dog, put glass ornaments and tinsel at a height level she can’t reach when standing.

    Candles always add a fabulous festive touch but are a huge fire hazard as they can easily be knocked over with a wagging tail or pulled from a table if your cat gets hold of the tablecloth. Err on the side of caution and invest in flameless candles. Luckily, there is a huge array to choose from.

    Holiday Plants From Mistletoe to Poinsettias

    Nothing is more festive than decking the halls, but remember that both holly and mistletoe are toxic to pets and can cause acute stomach and intestinal irritation, cardiovascular collapse, and death. Despite the myths, the ever-popular Christmas poinsettias are considered safe for pets. Even so, try to keep them away from both pets and children because the milky sap can cause skin allergies and has a terrible bitter taste.

    Party Time and Festive Feasts

    The holiday season is synonymous with family feasts—huge stuffed turkeys, corn on the cob and tempting desserts. Never feed you're your pets turkey bones (or any other bones from the table). Bones are a choking hazard and so are corncobs. So when you clear the table deal with anything left on plates immediately by tossing in the trash.

    Also, when putting away the leftovers, be careful your dog doesn’t get a hold of anything wrapped in aluminum foil. If eaten, foil can cut a dog's intestines, causing internal bleeding, and, in some cases, even death. Plastic wrap is equally dangerous and can cause choking or intestinal obstructions.

    The moniker “drink responsibly” also applies to taking care of your dog. Alcoholic beverages can be poisonous to pets, so never leave drinks unattended. If your pooch consumes them, she could become very intoxicated and weak, depressed, or even go into a coma.  In severe cases, death from respiratory failure can also occur.

    If you are planning a huge party that involves caterers and furniture being delivered, be sure to secure your pets in one area of your home during set-up. This is one time doors will be left open and there is too much activity to monitor them carefully.

    And on the day of the event, remember not all pets enjoy raucous laughter, loud music and hectic activity. Be sure to bring out your ThunderShirts for both your dogs and cats and put them on even if you are going to secure them in another part of the house.

    Home Alone

    Finally, if you plan to travel during the season and are unable to take your pals with you, don’t leave them alone at home with a stocked-up food bowl. Make arrangements with a pet sitter or check him into a pet hotel. Once again, make sure ID tag information is current.

    Happy Howlidays!

  • Guest Blogger: Mikkel Becker Discusses Leash Pulling

    It's all too common to see a pet parent being drug down the road while attached to their dog, looking similar to a musher minus the sled. The dog is so enthralled with all the distractions, smells and sights, they forget their person is attached to the other end of the leash. As an animal trainer, pulling on leash is one of the most common behavior problems I work with.

    Pulling into pressure is a natural response for dogs. When their collar is pulled, many dogs innately move against that pressure. This means when the leash becomes taut, the dog is more likely to move against the pressure and pull rather than give into the pressure and let up pulling. Canines also learn through experience that pulling on leash works to get where they want to go faster.

    A dog that pulls on the leash makes the walk very uncomfortable for the person and risks injury to their sensitive neck area. When a dog pulls on leash, the person has less control and may subsequently let the leash slip from their hands or be less able to avoid hazards, like traffic. Tighter leashes add to a dog’s stress level and increase unwanted behaviors like barking and lunging on the leash.

    It's essential to teach dogs to walk on a looser leash, both to make walks more relaxed and safer for person and dog. Preventing pulling and teaching loose leash walking can be done using a few training tactics and the right type of equipment. I want to share with you my top tips for teaching a dog to walk nicely on leash:

    Putting the right equipment on a dog immediately hinders pulling, even without training. It’s important to choose equipment for your canine that will offer control without being physically harmful. There are numerous walking tools on the market, many of which inflict pain on the dog or restrict airflow. These are not ideal walking solutions, because they are physically damaging and rarely stop the problem pulling. They also cause negative associations with their handler and different stimulus’ in the environment, like other dogs or people.

    One of the top tools in my training belt is the ThunderLeash. It's a leash with a built-in mechanism to be turned into a gentle anti-pull device. The system works with pressure, as it tightens to add pressure when the dog pulls, making it more comfortable to walk on a loose leash. The ThunderLeash does not cause pain, but uses the reward of slack as the dog walks nicely on the leash.

    IMG_7697_(16)

    The system is also adjustable so that the harness never becomes too tight, but also stays tight enough to not slip off. The ThunderLeash is an ideal tool for pet parents in my puppy classes, as the system grows with the dog avoiding the need to otherwise buy multiple sizes as the dog gets bigger. The ThunderLeash also transitions to a standard leash, making it easy to switch from anti-pull harness to regular leash as the situation warrants.

    It’s essential all family members walking the dog are consistent with training. If only one person does the training and others allow the dog to sled dog pull, training is less effective. Consistency is key for lasting change. If for any reason training cannot be done by that individual, the dog should be walked on a gentle anti-pull device, like the ThunderLeash, to prevent reinforcement of the pulling habit.

    Reduced pulling from the use of proper walking equipment makes the training of walking properly on a leash much simpler. To train a dog to walk nicely on leash, the canine should be taught an alternative behavior to pulling. I like to teach a dog to heel. A heel is where the dog walks calmly on a loose leash at their person’s side.

    Train your dog to heel by marking the behavior with a clicker or a verbal “good” whenever their shoulder is in-line with your leg. Deliver treats to the dog right next to your leg. Start in a low distraction environment where the dog is unlikely to pull. If the dog is in front of you, turn so they will be behind you and end up moving next to your leg as you walk forward. As their shoulder aligns with your leg, mark the behavior and reward. Continue to reward the dog on an intermittent basis for staying by your side. For toy crazy dogs, reward heeling with the toss of a ball or other desirable play item.

    Add in turns, changes in speed and stopping. The more interesting you are, the more likely your dog will pay attention. Once your dog is reliably in the heel position, add a word to the behavior by saying “heel” as the dog moves next to you. Vary the amount of steps taken before you treat, both extending the steps taken before the dog receives a reward and keeping short durations thrown in to keep it exciting. Once your dog heels like a pro in a low distraction area, move into more distracting areas, like the driveway.

    Vary the rewards for heeling. Treats or toys should be given during training to keep the behavior strong, but other rewards like getting to sniff a bush or greeting a friendly dog are other environmental rewards for heeling.

    Once a dog learns to heel, you can train them to walk on a loose leash as well. Dogs enjoy having space to explore and sniff, and always being directly at your side is not ideal. The ThunderLeash will prevent pulling while you practice. To teach loose leash walking, if the leash becomes tight, stop and reverse directions by gently turning in the other direction. Only allow forward motion as there is slack. Stay consistent in not allowing forward movement when the leash is tight, and soon your dog will soon learn pulling no longer works, but a loose leash does.

    Training a dog to walk on a loose leash takes work, but is well worth the effort. The more enjoyable walks are for you, the more likely they will happen. The more walks your pet gets, the more satisfied and better able to settle in the home your dog will be. Start the training today! Your dog will thank you for it.

     

    Mikkel Becker is a well-known and respected pet behavior and training expert, and Vetstreet.com contributor.

  • There’s a new App in Town! Introducing ThunderRush!

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    We’ve tapped in to our tech side and have been working long and hard to develop a new, fun app for Android and Apple users, ThunderRush! Now available for download, plus all net proceeds benefit Petsmart Charities, which supports initiatives related to helping homeless pets nationwide!

    ThunderRush helps educate users about pet anxiety in a fun an interactive way! To play, gamers must help ThunderDog find his family before he is overcome with anxiety.  This “running” style game features a user-controlled ThunderDog who must earn ThunderTreats and ThunderToys to calm his anxiety and make it home safely. Players must make it through different levels in a certain amount of time to advance to the next level.

    The ThunderRush app can be downloaded for $0.99 at the Apple App Store and Google Play. So, get playing why don’t you!

    ThunderRush

  • How to Help Shelters

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    As Thanksgiving approaches, we feel that this is a wonderful time of year to remind us of what we are thankful for and how we can give back to those who need it. ThunderWorks would like to take this time to THANK all of those who help animals in shelters day in and day out.

    We understand that pet ownership is an important responsibility and that adopting a pet may not be an option, we’ve compiled some simple ways that you can still help animals in need in your area.

    Volunteer Opportunities

    • Lend a hand at fundraising and outreach events hosted by your local shelter. Common activities include greeting guests, setting up and breaking down tables, etc.
    • Hold a supply drive or garage sale to benefit a shelter. If your kids want to get involved, they could set up a collection box at their school or ask their friends for donations instead of birthday presents.
    • Assist with adoptions. Introduce people to the animals and answer their questions about owning a pet.
    • Foster a dog or cat for a week.
    • Walk dogs and pet cats.
    • Bathe, groom, and feed animals.

    Donation Opportunities

    • Postage stamps. Donations of un-cancelled stamps are used to help send thank-you letters to donors, pay bills, and send grant applications.
    • All-meat baby food (no onion powder). Dogs and cats can eat baby food, but check the label: onion powder can be toxic.
    • Bath towels, sheets, and blankets. Worn-down towels are perfect for drying animals after their baths, lining pet cages, and providing warm and comfy bedding.
    • Dye and fragrance-free detergent. Some cats and dogs are allergic to additives.
    • Other useful items to consider donating to a shelter near you include:
      • Paper towels
      • Canned cat and dog food
      • Cat carriers/dog crates
      • Dog/cat toys
      • Dog leashes

    If you are looking for a shelter in your area, visit http://www.petfinder.com/animal-shelters-and-rescues/ for more information.

  • Guest Blogger: Sandy Robins & Dealing with Home Related Anxiety Issues

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    Take it away Sandy!

    There’s good reason why dogs are dubbed “man’s best friend”; they love and thrive on companionship and especially enjoy the company of their favorite people.

    That’s why there is always a sad look when you go out the door in the morning, leaving them home alone for a large part of their day.

    To this end, behaviorists often recommend getting a pal for your pet so that they have each other for company. Getting a dog walker to come in will give some focus to your pooch’s day too and so will arranging for him to go to doggy daycare. But often such alternatives aren’t always feasible for a variety of reasons including financial considerations.

    Pets left on their own can get very lonely and bored. Some even suffer from separation anxiety and stress. All this leads to a variety of behavior issues such as excessive and continual barking and clawing -- the latter often being to the detriment of the front door!

    Chewing is another behavior, which can result from stress and anxiety as well as boredom. Often it’s not specific to that new chew toy you just purchased but directed at furniture such as the leg of the dining room table, with the dining chairs earmarked to be tackled next! Not to mention personal effects such as clothing, socks and shoes and even the iPad that may inadvertently have been left lying around.

    If you had a video cam set up, you would probably also see your dog also anxiously pacing up and down, and trembling while looking hopefully out of the window and, possibly, even eliminating on your favorite rug. And he could even start self-mutilating himself by pulling out chunks of fur and chewing himself raw in places.

    It’s really important for pet parents to understand that none of these behaviors are out of defiance or naughtiness. It all comes back to boredom, loneliness and stress.

    If you can’t change his environment, the answer to relieving stress and anxiety could a simple as getting him a ThunderShirt to wear while home alone.

    The ThunderShirt already has a proven record dealing with weather-related issues and loud noises that scare pets such as fireworks. And, the swaddling principle upon which it is based, works very well to relieve symptoms of stress and anxiety in the home environment too.

    The new ThunderSpray available for both dogs and cats also has a calming effect by mimicking a canine or feline mother’s natural pheromones and also contains lavender and chamomile, which are natural calming agents.  It’s a good idea to use in conjunction with the shirt by simply spraying a single burst on the neck of the shirt. It can also be used to spray inside a crate or on a dog bed (as well as in a car). The calming pheromones and fragrances will continue to release for an extended period and the liquid will dry stain-free.

    Very often stress and anxiety is exacerbated by loneliness and boredom. It's a great idea to take your dog for a really long walk in the mornings before you go off to work, so that when you do leave for the day, he’s been tired out and will be only too happy to snooze for part of the time he is home alone.  But it’s equally important to see that you ensure he has toys apart from just a chew toys to keep him engaged. He may like a nice comfort toy to carry around the house and sleep with too.

    There are wonderful dog puzzles available in different degrees of difficulty. It's a really good idea to use them as a feeder instead of leaving food in a regular bowl. This way your dog will have to work for his meal and, doing so, this is a great way to occupy his time. The ThunderToy is a stuffable chew toy that can be filled with food, or yummy treats such as ThunderTreats, which fit perfectly into the toy. This is a great combo to further help calm and distract stressed or anxious dogs.

    Leaving a TV on with a channel such as Animal Planet is something a lot of pets enjoy. Even a channel featuring soapies such as The Bold and the Beautiful and General Hospital will work because of the different voices that keep the drama going on screen and help to avoid it at home.

  • ThunderWorks Releases Infographic on the Alarming Numbers of Dogs Suffering from Anxiety

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    The number of dogs suffering from anxiety is probably higher than you think. In fact, studies have reported that more than 15 million dogs suffer from noise anxiety alone. In an effort to display this alarming information more visually, we developed this infographic that outlines the major causes of pet anxiety and how ThunderShirt has been the most popular and effective form of treatment.

    Check it out and please share with your fellow dog owners!

    TW_Infographic

  • A Calming Solution for Pet Anxiety is NOW Just a Spray Away!

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    The ThunderWorks family just got bigger! We are pleased to share the newest addition to our line of pet anxiety and calming products- the ThunderSpray for dogs and cats!

    ThunderSpray Front

    So how does it work?

    ThunderSpray calms and comforts pets by mimicking a mother’s natural pheromones and is comprised of soothing fragrances of lavender and chamomile.

    ThunderSpray can be used in two ways:

    1:  By spraying a single burst in the area where pets spend time, like a car or crate.

    2:  By using in conjunction with the ThunderShirt and sprayed on the neck of the ThunderShirt.

    The calming pheromones and fragrances will continue to release for an extended period, and the liquid will dry stain-free. ThunderSpray is extremely easy to use and smells great!

    ThunderSpray retails for $19.95 and can be purchased with free shipping HERE!

  • Happy Howl-O-Ween! Your dog deserves a Treat, don’t you think?!

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    Who says Halloween treats are reserved for humans only? Here’s a simple, healthy and ThunderWorks approved treat that you can make for your dog this Halloween!!! These peanut butter dog treats provide a good source of protein for our pups and the pumpkin adds extra fiber and digestive properties to your dog’s diet!

    Ingredients:

    (makes 25 treats)

    • 2 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
    • 2 eggs
    • 1/2 cup canned pumpkin
    • 2 tablespoons peanut butter
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    Instructions:

    •  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
    • Whisk together the flour, eggs, pumpkin, peanut butter, salt, and cinnamon in a bowl. Add water as needed to help make the dough workable, but the dough should be dry and stiff. Roll the dough into a 1/2-inch-thick roll. Cut into 1/2-inch pieces.
    • Bake in preheated oven until hard, about 40 minutes.

    MMMM…. Here’s to treating (and not tricking) your furry friend!

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