Monthly Archives: September 2013

  • Singing for ThunderShirt by Special Guest, Sandy Robins

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    I have always been “blessed” with cats that sing in the car. But Ziggy out sings every cat I’ve ever known.

    When we took him home from the animal shelter, I put his vocals down to nerves.

    Not long after, we had to take him to the vet for his kitty shots. The moment we placed him in his carrier, the singing began.

    It started off with a tentative operatic dolcissimo (very sweet) “mew”. Followed by a second and then a third.  As we turned the corner he started scratching on the side of the carrier and the mew got more espressivo (insistent). Then he tried a new tactic and the mews got doloroso (sad and mournful).  From his perspective, he probably thought I wasn’t listening so he began to get more insistenta (insistent) until his vocals turned fortissimo (very loud).

    On the way home, it was a repeat performance. He wasn’t being naughty; he was really just stressed and anxious. Who knows what experiences he had an in a car before we adopted him.

    A few weeks later we were off to the vet again for follow-up shots. And soon Ziggy was singing the same aria. The next week, when it was time for his rabies shot courtesy of the animal shelter, we were back in the car and Ziggy was singing again.

    What was so interesting was the fact that it sounded like the same song.

    Cats in fact have quite a large vocabulary. Author and naturalist Jean Craighead George who writes about the language cats have in her award-winning book The Cats of Roxville Station and has studied cats in nature, says that the different ways in which a cat meows has a special idiosyncratic meaning. She has categorized some feline vocalizations as follows. They are written phonetically to emphasize the different sound and tones:

    In Kittens:

    • Mew (high pitched and thin) - a polite plea for help
    • MEW! (loud and frantic) - an urgent plea for help

    Adult cats:

    • Mew - plea for attention
    • Meow - emphatic plea for attention
    • MEOW! - a command!
    • Mee-o-ow (with falling cadence) - protest or whine
    • MEE-o-ow (shrill whine) - stronger protest
    • MYUP! (short, sharp, single note) - righteous indignation
    • MEOW! Meow! (repeated) - panicky call for help
    • Mier-r-r-ow (chirrup with lilting cadence) - friendly greeting

    Soon I worked out that Ziggy had composed a feline “song”:

    Here are his lyrics:

    Mew…mew…

    MEW!!

    Meow

    MEOW!

    Mee-o-ow

    MYUP! MYUP!

    MEE-o-ow

    MEE-o-ow

    Second verse same as the first.

    So I decided to translate. It goes something like this:

    Hello… Helloow …

    What’s happening here?

    This isn’t fair

    You scooped me out of my favorite chair

    I was a sleep

    What did you think --I wouldn’t make a peep?

    What’s happening now?

    Meeow miaow

    The vet!! Oh No!

    I don’t want to go

    I’m prodded and given a shot

    It calls for a total boycott

    Take me home….

    NOW!!!

    Meow….

    Finally I couldn’t take it anymore. There are always going to be vet visits for one reason or another. So I decided he was the perfect candidate for a feline ThunderShirt.

    I decided the best way to test the shirt was the take him one way to the vet without it and put it on for the journey home.

    I chose a fairly innocuous vet visit, namely, he was simply going for a Mani-Pedi. No needles or prodding involved. I even took Fudge along in the hope that seeing how she behaved would perhaps help him remain calm.

    No such luck. The outward-bound trip was typical – very vocal with Fudge simply staring at him in disbelief that a cat could make so much noise. So just before we popped him back in his carrier, I put him in a ThunderShirt. I reckoned he wasn’t going to have to walk around wearing it so he didn’t need to get used to it from that standpoint.

    On with the shirt, into the carrier and off we went home. It’s a 15-minute drive. And I must say Fudge and I enjoyed it immensely -- in total silence! I don’t say he enjoyed the ride, but he didn’t seem stressed and anxious to get out of the carrier, as was his typical modus operandi.

    I was amazed how it worked instantly. But apart from keeping him calm, it helped me to drive home fully concentrating on the road and not worrying about my feline passenger.

    When we got home, I took off the shirt and placed in his carrier, ready to go for next time.

     

    Sandy Robins  is an award-winning author and pet lifestyle expert.

    Follow her on Facebook here: http://www.Facebook.com/SandyRobinsPetLifestyleExpert

  • ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL?... and maybe some fetch?

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    With football season commencing this month, we thought it would be fun to share some photos of NFL players with their favorite furry friends! See, even big burly linemen have a soft side for their pooch!

    Karlos Dansby, linebacker for the Miami Dolphins and his two ADORABLE pups!

    karlos

    Jacksonville Jaguars Quarterback, David Garrard and his super cute yorkie.

    david

    Chicago Bears running back, Matt Forte and his lovable dog Ali.

    matt

    Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall and his dog duo!

    brandon

     Arizona Cardinals, AJ Jefferson takes a stretch break with his furry friend!

    aj

    Miami Dolphins wide receiver, Davone Bess poses with his new puppy!

    davone

    Jacksonville Jaguar’s quarterback Chad Henne and his canine companion!

    chad

    Cheers and “ruff’s” to a GREAT NFL season!!!!

    Images Via

  • ThunderLeash Review

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    Thank you to Well Minded World for this great review!!

    http://wellmindedword.com/2013/09/10/thunderleash-the-simpler-no-pull-solution-has-become-our-no-choke-solution/

    Here is a preview:

    I loved how the instructions were right on the front. So simple!

    The ThunderLeash is a full leash, just like it says. It can be used as a regular leash when your dog isn’t pulling, and can quickly be converted while it’s on your dog, should your dog start pulling. The patent-pending “harness slot” allows you to simply wrap the leash around your dog’s torso, just under his “arm pits.”

  • Your Dog’s Bark… DECODED!

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    In an article from Psychology today, Stanly Coren, Ph.D dissects a dog’s bark to help pet owners understand what our dogs are trying to tell us.

    “Barking is an alarm sound. There is no threat of aggression signaled by the dog unless it is lower pitched and mixed with growls. Let's consider the interpretation of the most common barks,” said Coren.

    Rapid strings of 2 to 4 barks with pauses between is the most common form of barking and is the classic alarm bark meaning something like "Call the pack. There is something going on that should be looked into."

    Barking in a fairly continuous string but lower pitch and slower than the usual alarm bark suggests that the dog is sensing an imminent problem. Thus this sound means "The intruder (or danger) is very close. I don't think that he is friendly. Get ready to defend yourself!"

    One or two sharp short barks of high or midrange pitch is the most typical greeting sound, and it usually replaces the alarm barks when the visitor is recognized as friendly. Many people are greeted in this way when they walk in the door. It really means "Hello there!" and is usually followed with the dog's typical greeting ritual

    Long string of solitary barks with deliberate pauses between each one is a sign of a lonely dog asking for companionship.

    A stutter bark, which sounds something like "Harr-ruff" is usually given with front legs flat on the ground and rear held high and simply means "Let's play!"

    Hopefully these bark translations will help you understand your pooch better, the next time they are trying to get your attention!

  • It’s a Smoky Situation…

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    While we usually speak on the dangers and possible pet anxiety-triggers caused by summer storms, it’s important to be aware that forest fires can also bring stress to your pet. Lately, many of the areas in west coast region have been in flames due to forest and brush fires, and it’s not just the flames that are destructive- fire smoke can travel hundreds of miles, affecting the air quality throughout a whole region and forcing our pets to stay inside.

    For pets that are accustomed to consistent time outside, posting up indoors may spur on added anxiety or destructive behavior. To combat this, we suggest our ThunderShirt, ThunderToy and ThunderTreat to help calm your pet and keep them occupied as the smoke clears. While short trips to answer nature’s call are inevitable, keep in mind that heavy smoke can take a toll on our pet’s respiratory systems just as it can on ours. Additionally, if your home is in danger of a fire and you are forced to evacuate, the hustle and bustle of packing your things can spark anxious behavior in your dog. Consider using ThunderShirt when packing and to take with you to a safe location to help your dog stay calm and relaxed.

    Live in an area prone to forest fires? Here’s some safety tips for you and your furry friends!

    If your area’s air quality is labeled “unhealthy”

    • Shelter in place, stay indoors.
    •  Keep you and your pet hydrated to progress a cough and help prevent smoky air from settling in the lungs
    •  Use air conditioning if possible, to help filter air throughout a house
    •  Keep all doors and windows shut in both home and vehicles, if in a vehicle make sure the air conditioner is set to reticulate the air
    •  Humidifiers will help the air quality in a home or building

    If You Are Forced to Evacuate

    Plan ahead for a safe place for your pet
    Evacuation shelters generally don’t accept pets and for this reason it’s important to plan ahead to ensure that your pets and family will have a safe place to stay. Research hotels and motels outside your immediate area for pet policies and ask friends and relatives outside the area if you and your pets can stay with them in case of a disaster.

    Proper Identification and Updated Vaccinations
    Having your pet licensed AND microchipped can protect your pet and help identify them if they were to become lost. Also, keep your pet’s vaccinations current, and keep the records handy.

    Leave early and take your pet
    One of the most important things to do if you are evacuating your home is to take your pets with you because you may be forced to stay away longer than anticipated. In addition, leave early and don’t wait for mandatory evacuation orders because if emergency officials have to evacuate you, you might be told to leave your pets behind.

    If you are away
    The risk of a fire may strike when you’re away from home. Make arrangements in advance with a trusted neighbor (who is comfortable with your pets and knows where in the home they are likely to be) to take them and meet you at a specified location.

    Picture perfect
    Have a photograph taken of you with your pets to show proof of ownership should you become separated.

    Pet carriers 
    Have pet carriers ready that are the correct sizes for each of your pets. Make sure each carrier is labeled with your contact information, should you become separated from your pet.

    Prepare an emergency kit
    Have a pet emergency kit prepared and ready for a disaster like a forest fire. This kit should have:

    • Three-plus days supply food and food bowls, water and two weeks of your pet’s medications
    • A ThunderShirt
    • Litter boxes with litter, if you have cats
    • Extra leashes and collars
    • Vaccination and medical records
    • Photos and descriptions of each pet
    • Pet first aid kit and pet first aid book

    Emergency numbers:
    If you have to evacuate at the last minute and cannot take your pets, don’t be a hero and return to the danger zone to try to rescue them.  Contact a trained professional rescue team, such as your local animal humane society.

    (tips adapted via)

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